The International Conference: Re-Thinking Humanities and Social Sciences
Circa 2011-2013



For several years this was the official website for the International Conference: “Re-Thinking Humanities and Social Sciences.
Content is from the site's 2011-2013 archived pages, as well as other outside sources..

The 4th annual International Conference on Re-Thinking Humanities and Social Sciences was cancelled in 2014.

 


2011 2nd International Conference

The Second International Conference: “Re-Thinking Humanities and Social Sciences. The Zone and Zones - Radical Spatiality in our Times?” Date: 01–04.09.2011. Site: Zadar, Croatia. Deadline: 01.06.2011

Organiser: University of Zadar 

Topics: Possible topics include: The zone as a specific locality (local/global, suburbs as zones, tourist zones...); The zone as a supplement to „the Whole‟ (world system, urban space...); The war zones, urban zones, the zones-within-zones, private zones (private matrixes, virtual worlds…); The zone as a non-place (shopping malls, airports, motorways...); The military zones (ghettos, occupied territories, frontiers, borders...);  Concentration camps and asylum  centers  (the  zone  as  spatialised  state  of  exception);  Gothic  and  fantastic  spaces/zones;  Contact-zones (museums, borderlands... ); Radical zone as Third space, created and populated by the marginalized; The zone as a symptom (the zone may be viewed as a particular spatial entity that subverts its broader foundation, its own genius...);  The  Zone  as  the  site  of  political  struggle;  Zones  and  the  construction  of  identity;  The  history  of spaces/zones; Virtual zones (games...); etc. 

 



2012 3rd International Conference

The 3rd International Conference on Re-Thinking Humanities and Social Sciences is to be held at the University of Zadar, Croatia, from September 6 – 9, 2012. The conference is an invaluable opportunity for meeting, exchanging and debating current topics in humanities and social sciences.

 Keynote speakers

   Professor Laura Mulvey

Department of History of Art and Screen Media School of Arts Birkbeck, University of London

Current research interests

  • Rethinking feminist film theory.
  • Theories of technology and aspects of technological change in film and television.
  • The aesthetics of stillness in the moving image: avant-garde and fiction.
  • The ‘new woman’ and the cinema in the late 1920s. Melodrama and world cinema

Areas of research supervision

  • Certain aspects of feminist film theory;
  • women and film history;
  • technology and film history;
  • new approaches to modernity and cinema.

Selected publications

Books

2010 Do Utraty Wzroku. Wybor Tekstow (Polish edition of selected LM essays; Korporacja Halart; Warsaw 2010)

2009 Visual and Other Pleasures -2nd expanded edition (Palgrave Macmillan)

2007 (co-edited with Jamie Sexton) British Experimental Television (Manchester University Press)

2006 Death Twenty-four Times a Second: Stillness and the Moving Image. Reaktion Books, London

1996 Fetishism and Curiosity, BFI, London; Indiana University Press, Bloomington USA (Chinese translation forthcoming)

1992 Citizen Kane, Film Classics Series BFI, London (translated: German, Portuguese, Korean, Hebrew, Spanish, Czech)

1989 Visual and Other Pleasures. Macmillan, London; Indiana University Press Bloomington (translated: Greek)

1972 Douglas Sirk A collection of essays co-edited with Jon Halliday. Edinburgh Film Festival

Articles

2010

  • ‘Unmasking the Gaze: Feminist film theory, History and Film Studies’ in Vicki Callahan (ed) Reclaiming the Archive: Feminism and Film History Wayne University Press

2009

  • ‘Paisaje, cine y estetica de la demora’ in N.Miro (ed): Los Tempios de un Lugar CEDAN Huesca Spain
  • ‘Conversation: Ostranenie and the Uncanny’ in A. van Oever (ed)) Ostranenie Amsterdam University Press
  • ‘Rear Projection: Modernity in a Special Effect’ in Mark Lewis: A Cold Morning 53 Biennale di Venezia
  • ‘Between Melodrama and Realism: Under the Skin of the City’ ’in James Walters and Tom Brown (eds) Moments in Film: Critical Methods and Approaches Palgrave Macmillan London
  • ‘Mark Lewis and the Clumsy Sublime: How an Archaic Device Came to Represent an Uncertain Present’ in Clare Pajakowska and Luke White (eds): Sublime Now Cambridge Scholars Publishing

2008

  • ‘The Young Modern Woman of the 1920s: A Convergence of Feminist Film Theory and Gender Studies’ in G. Alonge and R.West (eds.) Dossier: cinema e gender studie.s La Valle dell’Eden Anno IX n. 19 Turin
  • ‘Stillness and the Moving Image’ D.Campany (ed) The Cinematic Documents of Contemporary Art Whitechapel Gallery London
  • ‘Cosmetics and Abjection: Cindy Sherman 1977-87’ October Files 6 New York (reprint)
  • ‘Douglas Sirk: director of actors’ P.Bertetto (ed): Azione! (Come i grandi registi dirigono gli attori) Rome Film Festival

2007

  • ‘Repetition and Return: the Spectator’s Memory in Abbas Kiarostami’s Koker Trilogy’ Third Text London
  • ‘A Sudden Gust of Wind (after Hokusai): from after to before the photograph. Oxford Art Journal (special issue on Jeff Wall)
  • ‘Compilation film as deferred action: Vincent Monnikendam’s Mother Dao, the turtle-like’ Andrea Sabbadini (ed): Projected Shadows: Psychoanalytic Reflections on the Representation of Loss in European Cinema Routledge, London

2006

  • ‘Within a single shot: discontinuities of time and space’ Catalogue: Mark Lewis exhibition FACT Gallery, Liverpool, England
  • ‘Les premiers quartres plans d’Imitation of Life’ Traffic, Paris, France
  • ‘Cindy Sherman: Cosmetics and Abjection’ Exhibition Catalogue: Cindy Sherman (Retrospective Jeu de Paume, Paris); Cindy Sherman October Files, New York.

2005

  • ‘Alan Jones’ Francis and Foster (eds) Pop Phaidon (London))

2004

  • ‘Death Drives’ in R.Allen & S.Ishi-Gonzales: Past and Future Hitchcock. Routledge, London
  • ‘Passing time: reflections on cinema from a new technological age’ Screen 45

2003

  • ‘Journey to Italy’ spoken commentary for the DVD published by the British Film Institute
  • ‘Cinema, Synch Sound and Europe 1929: Reflections on Coincidence’ in L.Sider (ed) Soundscapes. The School of Sound Lectures 1998-2001. Wallflower Press, London
  • ‘Death Twenty-four Times a Second: The Inorganic Body and the Cinema’ in Paul Sheehan (ed): Becoming Human. New Perspectives on the Inhuman Condition. Praeger, Westport
  • ‘Foreword’ in A.Sabbadini (ed): The Couch and the Silver Screen. Psychoanalytic Reflection on European Cinema Routledge London
  • ‘Jill Forbes’ Les Enfants du Paradis in: French Cultural Studies Vol 14 Part 3 Number 42
  • ‘Then and now: cinema as history in the light of new media and new technologies’ in L.Nagib (ed) The New Brazilian Cinema. I.B.Tauris, London
  • ‘The ‘pensive spectator’ Revisited: Time and its Passing in the Still and Moving Image’ in D.Green (ed): Where is the Photograph? Photoforum, Brighton (also published in T.Leighton and p.Buchler (eds): Saving the Image: Art after Film, Centre for Contemporary Arts, Glasgow)

2002

  • ‘Afterword’ R.Tapper: The New Iranian Cinema. Politics, Representation and Identity I.B Tauris, London.
  • ‘Detail, Digression and Death. The movies in Chris Petit’s film Negative Space.’ Afterall, Issue5, London

2001

  • ‘The problem of America: the problem of sound’ in Critical Quarterly Autumn 2001
  • ‘Death Drives: Hitchcock’s Psycho’, Film Studies 2
  • ‘The Index and the Uncanny’ in Time and the Image C.Gill and T.Matthews (eds.) Manchester University Press
  • ‘Vesuvian Topographies: the Eruption of the Past in Journey to Italy’ in Roberto Rossellini: One Hundred Years G.Nowell-Smith and D.Forgacs (eds.) The British Film Institute. London
  • ‘Death 24 Times a Second’, Coil 9/10. London.
  • ‘Den Blick demaskieren. Hollywood-Kino, weiblisches Publikum und Konsumkultur’ I.Schenk (ed.) Erlebnisort Kino. Bremen, Germany.
  • ‘Death 24 times a second: the tension between movement and stillness in the cinema’. Estudos de Cinema No.3 Sao Paolo, Brazil.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

   Lauren Berlant

George M. Pullman Professor

Department of English 

University of Chicago

My work has focused on the affective components of belonging in the U.S. nineteenth and twentieth centuries—now the twenty-first: in particular, in relation to juridical citizenship, to informal and normative modes of social belonging, and to practices of intimacy as they absorb legal, normative, and fantasmatic forces. These scenes of relation articulate state, juridical, and institutional practices of zoning and more abstract boundary-drawing—between public and private, white and non-white, and/or citizen and foreigner—with other kinds of social bonds through which people imagine and practice world-making.

I am interested in how modes of social membership flourish that absorb the blows of power while preserving critical and optimistic attachments to the political as a site of a vaguely rendered, collective ongoingness or potentiality. To this end, I have finished a trilogy on national sentimentality—in order of their historical address, The Anatomy of National Fantasy (Chicago, 1991); The Female Complaint: The Unfinished Business of Sentimentality in American Culture (2009); and The Queen of America Goes to Washington City: Essays on Sex and Citizenship (Duke, 1997). I have also followed out this interest in collective attachments and affects in my edited volumes Intimacy (Chicago, 2000); Our Monica, Ourselves: Clinton and the Affairs of State (with Lisa Duggan; NYU, 2001); and Compassion: the Culture and Politics of an Emotion (Routledge, 2004)

Selected Publications

  • Cruel Optimism (Duke UP, 2011)
  • “Love as a Properly Political Concept” (Response to Michael Hardt), Cultural Anthropology (2011)
  • “Affect and the Politics of Austerity,” Variant 38/40, with Gesa Helms, Marina Vischmidt (2011)
  • “Opulism,” SAQ (2010)
  • “Neither Monstrous nor Pastoral, but Scary and Sweet: Some Thoughts on Sex and Emotional Performance in Intimacies and What Do Gay Men Want?” Women and Performance (2009)
  • “Affect Is the New Trauma,” The Minnesota Review (2009). Rpt. 2010.
  • “The Broken Circuit: An Interview with Lauren Berlant,” by Sina Najafi and David Serlin, Cabinet (2008).
  • “Thinking about Feeling Historical,” Emotion, Space, and Society 1, 1 (2008). Rpt. Political Emotions, ed., Janet Staiger, Ann Cvetkovich, and Ann Reynolds (2010).
  • “Risky Bigness: On Obesity, Eating, and the Ambiguity of “Health,” in Jonathan Metzl et al., Against Health/ (NYU, 2010).
  • The Female Complaint: The Unfinished Business of Sentimentality in American Culture (Duke UP, 2008).
  • “Nearly Utopian, Nearly Normal: Post-Fordist Affect in La Promesse and Rosetta” Public Culture 19, 2 (2007): 272-301.
  • Keyword, “Citizenship,” in Keywords of American Cultural Studies, Edited by Bruce Burgett and Glenn Hendler, http://www.nd.edu/~ghendler/keywords.html (NYU press, 2007).
  • “Cruel Optimism,” Differences 17, 5 (2006): 21-36; and New Formations (2008; longer version).
  • “Starved,” SAQ 106:3 (2007), 433-444.
  • “Slow Death,” in Critical Inquiry 33 (Summer 2007): 754-780.
  • The Queen of America Goes to Washington City: Essays on Sex and Citizenship (Duke UP, 1997).
  • Compassion, ed. (Routledge, 2004).
  • Our Monica, Ourselves: The Clinton Affair and the National Interest. Ed. with Lisa Duggan (NYU Press, 2001).
  • Venus Inferred, with Laura Letinsky (University of Chicago, 2000).
  • “Unfeeling Kerry,” Theory and Event 8, 2 (2005).
  • “The Epistemology of State Emotion,” in Dissent in Dangerous Times, ed. Austin Sarat (Ann Arbor MI: University of Michigan Press, 2005).
  • “Two Girls, Fat and Thin,” in Regarding Sedgwick, eds. Stephen Barber and David Clark (New York: Routledge, 2002).
  • “Love (A Queer Feeling),” Psychoanalysis and Homosexuality, eds. Tim Dean and Christopher Lane (Chicago, 2000), 432-451.
  • “Sex in Public.” Written with Michael Warner. Critical Inquiry (Winter 1998).
  • Editor, “Intimacy: A Special Issue,” Critical Inquiry (Winter 1998).
  • “Poor Eliza,” in American Literature (1998).
  • “Pax Americana: The Case of Show Boat,” in Institutions of the Novel (Duke UP, 1997).
  • “The Female Woman: Fanny Fern and the Form of Sentiment,” in The Culture of Sentiment (Oxford, 1993).
  • “National Brands/National Body: Imitation of Life,” in The Phantom Public Sphere (Minnesota UP, 1993).
  • The Anatomy of National Fantasy: Hawthorne, Utopia, and Everyday Life (Chicago, 1991).

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

2013 4th International Conference

4th International Re-Thinking Humanities and Social Sciences Conference , University of Zadar, Croatia, September 5-7, 2013

Re-Thinking Humanities and Social Sciences Conference

Contact email: rhss.conference@gmail.com

4th International Re-Thinking Humanities and Social Sciences Conference is to be held at the University of Zadar, Croatia, September 5-7, 2013. Since 2010 the conference offers an invaluable opportunity to meet, exchange ideas and debate on current topics in humanities and social sciences. This year's conference focuses on the ways in which violence is conceived and perceived within different contexts, the ways in which literature, film, performance, and other forms of art relate to and incorporate contemporary outbursts of violence, the new ways in which this process can be theorized in the field of humanities and social sciences, and finally the ways in which this type of violence changes cultural politics of diversity in societies.

   Keynote Speakers

   Mark Devenney is a Principal Lecturer in politics and philosophy and he leads the Humanities Programme degrees at the University of Brighton. His main research interests lie in contemporary Political Philosophy, with research expertise on Critical Theory (Adorno and Habermas) and contemporary Continental philosophy (notably Agamben, Hardt and Negri, Laclau, Ranciere, Derrida, Zizek and Badiou.) He uses this theoretical work to research different ways of valuing life, in a research project that focuses on the uses and abuses of human bodies (torture, patening, suicide bombing, genetic engineering and the ethics of life/death decisions).

   Fred Botting is a Professor of English Literature and Creative Writing at Kingston University, London (UK). He has taught English Literature, Critical Theory, Film and Cultural Studies at the Universities of Lancaster, Keele and Cardiff. He has written extensively on Gothic fictions as well as on theory, film and cultural forms. His current research projects include work on fiction and film dealing with figures of horror and on spectrality, the uncanny and sexuality.

Full Call for Papers
On Violence

The financial crisis, the terrorist threat, natural disasters (such as the earthquake in L'Aquila, Italy) or immigration policies are just some of global issues where some of the new practices of social regulation can be detected. One of the important elements of the new ways in which societies experience this new regulation is ambivalent relation to violence. Although violence is often conceptualized as a non-human condition, coming from the collapse of the symbolic order, it is, however, precisely the symbolic order that organizes and structures violence. On the other hand, it is often allocated to the other thus promoting a new geopolitical map that now, in the post Cold War world, draws borders between us and them (violent Islamists, tribal Balkans, threatening Chinese). The case of Breivik showed that detecting the object of violence and performing a violent act can never be outside of symbolic but precisely in its core.
This raises questions such as: What is violence today? Who is the agent of violence? How is violence performed? In what way is violence (dis)approved? Can violence be outsourced? Are the military and the police as traditional agents of social regulation of violence regulated in a new way? Who are the victims of violence? Can victims reflect their condition? Are societies and individuals dealing with the new kind of traumas? Are there new social interpretations of the violent events in their past? What is a new relationship between different religions and violence? Are the new social movements appearing throughout the world (Occupy, Pirate Parties International, the Invisible Committee, Arab Spring Movement) offering a new way of resistance to new regulation?
At this conference we would like to focus on (1) the ways in which violence is conceived and perceived within different contexts, (2) the ways in which literature, film, performance, and other forms of art relate to and incorporate contemporary outbursts of violence, (3) the new ways in which this process can be theorized in the field of humanities and social sciences, and finally (4) the ways in which this type of violence changes cultural politics of diversity in societies.

 Possible topics include (but are not limited to):
• Violence in literature, film and art
• Life after violence
• Experience of structural violence
• Historical approach to violence – its same morphology but different mechanisms
• New conceptualization of violence in the humanities
• Gender specific violence and its cultural background, race, disability
• Agents of structural violence and their opponents (including humanities and social sciences)
• Social construction of memories of violence
• Violence in/and popular culture

 Abstracts
Abstracts are invited from scholars from different fields and disciplines of humanities and social sciences for individual papers (15-20 minutes including discussion time).
Please submit your abstracts (no more than 300 words in length) electronically using Abstract Submission Form available at www.rhss-conference.com by June 1st 2013. Selected conference papers will be published.
Abstracts should be in Word or RTF formats and include the following:
a) author(s),
b) affiliation,
c) e-mail address,
d) title of abstract,
e) keywords + body of abstract

Please use the plain text (Times New Roman 12, single spacing, justified) and abstain from using any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and reply to all proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us within a week from your submission, you should assume we did not receive your proposal; in that case we suggest trying an alternative electronic route or resending.
The conference language is English.

 Registration
Registration will be completed upon your arrival at the University of Zadar. Upon registration the participants will receive a welcome package as well as their credentials and certificate for presenting the paper.

 Conference Fees
Early Bird (by June 30): 90 Euros
Normal Registration (by July 31): 120 Euros
Late Registration (upon arrival or during August and September): 140 Euros
Unwaged: 50 Euros
Cancellation received before August 1, 2013 will receive a refund of 50% of the registration fee.

 Dates
Proposal submission deadline is June 1, 2013.
Final conference announcement and program will be published on August 15, 2013 on the conference website (http://www.rhss-conference.com).
Duration of conference: September 5-7, 2013

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

CALL FOR PAPERS

RE-THINKING HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 2013

 CONFERENCE DEADLINE EXTENDED - JUNE 15

4th International Re-Thinking Humanities and Social Sciences Conference is to be held at the University of Zadar, Croatia, September 5-7, 2013. Since 2010 the conference offers an invaluable opportunity to meet, exchange ideas and debate on current topics in humanities and social sciences. This year’s conference focuses on the ways in which violence is conceived and perceived within different contexts, the ways in which literature, film, performance, and other forms of art relate to and incorporate contemporary outbursts of violence, the new ways in which this process can be theorized in the field of humanities and social sciences, and finally the ways in which this type of violence changes cultural politics of diversity in societies.

Keynote Speakers

Mark Devenney is a Principal Lecturer in politics and philosophy and he leads the Humanities Programme degrees at the University of Brighton. His main research interests lie in contemporary Political Philosophy, with research expertise on Critical Theory (Adorno and Habermas) and contemporary Continental philosophy (notably Agamben, Hardt and Negri, Laclau, Ranciere, Derrida, Zizek and Badiou.) He uses this theoretical work to research different ways of valuing life, in a research project that focuses on the uses and abuses of human bodies (torture, patening, suicide bombing, genetic engineering and the ethics of life/death decisions).

Fred Botting is a Professor of English Literature and Creative Writing at Kingston University, London (UK). He has taught English Literature, Critical Theory, Film and Cultural Studies at the Universities of Lancaster, Keele and Cardiff. He has written extensively on Gothic fictions as well as on theory, film and cultural forms. His current research projects include work on fiction and film dealing with figures of horror and on spectrality, the uncanny and sexuality.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

PROGRAM

  CONFERENCE PROGRAM IS AVAILABLE 

- Presentations (including discussion) are limited to 20 minutes, regardless of the number of presenters in a particular session. Moderators (Conference Chairs) for each session will notify you during the presentation when you have 10, 5 and/or 1 minute left for your presentation.

- All rooms are equipped for the Power Point Presentation. In case you need speakers for your presentation please make sure to contact the organizers in advance. In case you use Apple computers, please save your presentation in a PDF form in case of technical difficulties.

- Further details about the conference and the program will be in the Book of Abstracts, which all the participants will receive upon their arrival, and it will be made available for download from our website one week before the conference.

Supported by:

mzosunizd

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TRAVEL INFO

 Air Travel to Zadar

Direct Ryanair flights to Zadar are available from London (Stansted) and Dublin.

Germanwings, Sky Europe, InterSky and other low-cost carriers also fly to Zadar from selected locations in Europe. Zadar can also be reached by plane flying Croatia Airlines from a number of European cities.

Sometimes it is preferable to fly by plane to Zagreb (well serviced by a number of European airlines) and then take a bus to Zadar. Buses from Zagreb’s main bus station to Zadar are frequent, and the ride takes 3 to 4 hours (detailed information below).

 Transportation from Zadar Airport

Buses from Zadar Airport to Zadar’s main bus station depart upon the arrival of every scheduled flight.

Buses depart from the main bus station to the airport one hour before the scheduled take-off from Platform 35.

One-way bus ticket price is 25 Croatian kunas (3.5 euros), baggage transportation included.

By taxi:

Upon the arrival at Zadar Airport a taxi service is at your disposal. If you are heading from the city of Zadar to the airport, you may order a taxi by calling 023 251 400.

 Air Travel to Zagreb + Bus to Zadar

If you prefer to take a flight to Zagreb and then use a bus, there are frequent bus rides from Zagreb to Zadar from the main bus station in Zagreb.

The bus from Zagreb Airport brings you directly to the main bus station in Zagreb. The bus to Zadar takes a new route on the highway and it is a pleasant 3 to 4 hours drive with one 15 minutes stop. One-way ticket costs around 15 euros.

Direct lines from Zagreb to Zadar depart at 6.00; 8.00; 10.30; 14.00; 16.00; 16.30; 18.00; 20.00 hours.

Direct lines from Zadar to Zagreb are at 6.00; 7.30; 10.30; 12.30; 13.30, 17.00; 20.00 hours.

 Train to Zagreb + bus to Zadar

The main bus station in Zagreb is a short tram ride away from the main train station.

ACCOMMODATIONS

Participants are responsible for their own accommodation arrangements. Reservations should be made directly with the hotels

The recommended mode of train transportation to Zadar is to take the train to Zagreb (train service from a number of European cities) and then take a bus to Zadar. Taking a train from Zagreb to Zadar is not recommended as it takes a very long time (up to 8 hours), compared to the much more expedient bus transportation (3 to 4 hours).

 

ORGANIZING COMMITTEE

Senka Božić Vrbančić (senka_bozic@yahoo.com.au)
Zlatko Bukač (zlatko.bukac@gmail.com)
Jelena Kupsjak (jelena.kupsjak@gmail.com)
Tomislav Kuzmanović (tkuzmano@unizd.hr)
Atila Lukić (atilalukic@gmail.com)
Marko Lukić (Chair) (mlukic@unizd.hr)
Tomislav Pletenac (tpletena@ffzg.hr)
Adrijana Vidić (adrijana.vidic@gmail.com)
Mario Vrbančić (mario_exile@yahoo.co.nz)

 



 

SUMMER SCHOOL

Re-Thinking Humanities and Social Sciences Pre-Conference Activities (RHSS-SS)

  Summer School: the Politics of Difference

 September 1 –  September 5, 2013, Zadar

The University of Zadar’s English Department organizes Summer School: the Politics of Difference, which is part of the Globalization and Politics of Cultural Difference Project. The aim of the GPCD is to investigate the politics of cultural diversity through interdisciplinary focus on cultural policies and their articulation in media, film and literature: http://politicsofdifference.com/. Additionally, the Summer School is organized as part of the Re-Thinking Humanities and Social Sciences pre-conference activities and looks to become a regular annual gathering during which topics relevant to the issues investigated during the RHSS Conference will be covered and further developed.

Eligible participants include students (masters level and beyond), researchers and academics who want to advance in contemporary discourse theory and explore current politics of diversity over the course of a five-day summer school program.

The Summer School is open to everyone with academic work (or any other form of scholarly analysis) within the previously mentioned research areas. Participants are obliged to express their interest in the summer school in a motivation letter in which they should state whether they are interested in presenting their work or just want to participate in the summer school through group discussion and lectures.

Summer School: the Politics of Difference will include morning and afternoon sessions consisting of informal lectures, mini presentations of individual projects, and group discussions.

Please send your application for participation (a concise motivation letter, short CV and short summary of your work for presentation at the Summer School) to our school coordinators by August 15th 2013.

The Summer School will be hosted at the University of Zadar.

There is no registration fee.

Keynote speakers: Mark Devenney (University of Brighton) and Mario Vrbančić (University of Zadar)

Mark Devenney is a Principal Lecturer in politics and philosophy, and leads the Humanities Programme degrees at the University of Brighton. His main research interests are in contemporary Political Philosophy, with research expertise on Critical Theory (Adorno and Habermas), contemporary Continental philosophy (notably Agamben, Hardt and Negri, Laclau, Ranciere, Derrida, Zizek and Badiou). He uses this theoretical work to research different ways of valuing life, in a research project that focuses on the uses and abuses of human bodies (torture; patening; suicide bombing; genetic engineering and the ethics of life/death decisions).

Mario Vrbančić works in Department of English at the University of Zadar. He holds a Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of Auckland, New Zealand. He has worked in Croatia, New Zealand, Ukraine and Australia. He has written a number of academic articles and essays on psychoanalysis, postmodern literature, performance and cinema. His work has been published in various journals, including Performance Research, Comparative Literature and Culture, and New Literary History. His book is entitled The Lacanian Thing: Psychoanalysis, Postmodern Culture and Cinema (New York: Cambria Press 2011). He has also been involved in film projects and published one novel, Lab (2011), and several radio and theatrical plays.

 

RHSS-Conference.com